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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
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ISSN Imprimer: 1521-9437
ISSN En ligne: 1940-4344

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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v4.i1.90
6 pages

Biodiversity and Ecology of the Medicinal Mushrooms of Armenia

Siranush G. Nanagulyan
Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, Yerevan State University, 1, A. Manoogyan str., Yerevan 375025, Armenia
Alina L. Sirunyan
Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, Yerevan State University, 1, A. Manoogyan str., Yerevan 375025, Armenia
Eva Kh. Hovhannisyan
Medical University, 2, Korjun str.; and Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, Yerevan State University. 1 A. Manougian Str., Yerevan 375025, Armenia

RÉSUMÉ

This report is an attempt to generalize the data obtained for the authors' study of the distribution of fungi in Armenia with medicinal properties. Macromycetes, collected from different regions of Armenia, and critically processed herbarium collections, as well as data known from extensive literature, have served as baseline materials in this work. As a result of the study of the taxonomic structure of the investigated mushrooms in Armenia, 90 species have been established, which belong to 34 families and 59 genera. The discovered macromycetes belong to the division Eumycota, subdivision Basidiomycotina and Ascomycotina. Consideration of the systematic units of mushrooms in a rank of classes shows an indisputable prevalence of Homobasidiomycetes —68 species (75.6%) and Gasteromycetes—14 (15.6%). According to their manner of nutrition and the function they carry out in different niches, we can divide the researched species of mushrooms into six trophical groups: xylotrophs, humus saprotrophs, mycorrhizal, psammotrophs, litter saprotrophs, and coprotrophs. Among the registered wild fungi 50 species are edible and 4 are poisonous.


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