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WALL-MODELED LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF SHOCK/TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER INTERACTIONS IN A LOW ASPECT-RATIO DUCT

Ivan Bermejo-Moreno
Center for Turbulence Research Stanford University California, 94305-3030, USA

Laura M. Campo
Department of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University 488 Escondido Mall Building 500, Stanford, CA 94305

Johan Larsson
Center for Turbulence Research Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Currently at: Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA

Julien Bodart
Université de Toulouse, Institut Supérieur de l'Aéronautique et de l'Espace (ISAE) BP 54032 - 31055 TOULOUSE Cedex 4,France; Center for Turbulence Research Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

David B. Helmer
Department of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University 488 Escondido Mall Building 500, Stanford, CA 94305; Department of Civil & Mechanical Engineering, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY, USA, 10996

John K. Eaton
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University 488 Panama Mall Stanford, CA 94305 USA

Résumé

We present large-eddy simulations of the interaction of an oblique shock wave impinging and reflecting off a turbulent boundary layer in a nearly-square duct. A small compression wedge spanning the top wall of the duct deflects the incoming air stream (M = 2.05) generating a shock wave that interacts with the bottom wall turbulent boundary layer. The simulations incorporate an equilibrium wall model aimed at reproducing the moderately high Reynolds numbers of the boundary layer under consideration (Reθ ~ 6,500). Simulation results are first validated by comparison with experimental PIV data (Helmer et al., 2012; Campo et al., 2012) of mean and turbulence quan-tities taken in planes near the center of the duct and near the side walls. Two different strengths of the incident shock wave are considered, corresponding to increasing heights of the compression wedge. Planes perpendicular to the PIV measurements are then extracted from the simulations to complement experimental findings related to the three-dimensionality imposed by the side walls. In particular, the downstream evolution of corner flows is explored.