Library Subscription: Guest
Begell Digital Portal Begell Digital Library eBooks Journals References & Proceedings Research Collections
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Print: 1072-8325
ISSN Online: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2013005706
pages 165-183

THE UNDERGRADUATE STEM RESEARCH EXPERIENCES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES AT A HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGE

Jann Adams
Department of Psychology, Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia 30314, USA
Sinead Younge
Department of Psychology, Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia 30314, USA
Ulrica Wilson
Department of Mathematics, Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia 30314, USA
Willie Pearson, Jr.
School of History, Technology & Society, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
Cheryl B. Leggon
School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA

ABSTRACT

Despite some gains in recent years, and state and national efforts to improve the numbers and retention of Black men in colleges across the United States, Black males, compared to their female counterparts, continue to have lower rates of degree completion, particularly in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. In an effort to increase degree attainment, policymakers have begun investing considerable resources to ensure appropriate academic and social supports for Black male students in higher education. This paper examines the experiences of African American male undergraduates participating in a federally funded research training program at a Historically Black College. Using a mixed-method approach with qualitative interviews and quantitative survey data, the study examines the experiences of Black male students in terms of the following: persistence in intended major; highest aspirational degree; perception of academic preparedness; academic year and summer research experience; participation in professional STEM meetings; formal tours of graduate schools; and perceptions of the value of an undergraduate research experience. Findings show that students who participated in the formal undergraduate research program were more likely than their comparison peers to have persisted in their intended major; these students were also more likely to aspire to earn a STEM PhD or a joint MD/STEM PhD degree. Students also report their research experiences bolstered their performance in upper-level STEM courses, and enhanced their confidence in their ability to study science at a top-ranked department. Results show that preprofessional socialization into the community of science has remarkable consequences for the pursuit of STEM graduate education.


Articles with similar content:

THE SUMMER WAS WORTH IT: EXPLORING THE INFLUENCES OF A SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FOCUSED SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM ON THE SUCCESS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN FEMALES
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.21, 2015, issue 2
Dimitra Jackson-Smith
UNDERREPRESENTATION OF WOMEN OF COLOR IN THE SCIENCE PIPELINE: THE CONSTRUCTION OF SCIENCE IDENTITIES
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.17, 2011, issue 3
Robert Ceglie
RETAINING FEMALE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE: 1995 ANNUAL REPORT TO THE ALFRED P. SLOAN FOUNDATION
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.2, 1995, issue 4
Linda Carlin, Suzanne Gage Brainard, Suzanne Laurich-McIntyre
EXPLORING THE SOCIALIZATION EXPERIENCES OF UNDERREPRESENTED ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDENTS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.26, 2020, issue 4
Cherie D. Edwards, Catherine T. Amelink
WOMEN IN MALE-DOMINATED CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT COMMUNITY COLLEGES: BARRIERS TO PARTICIPATION AND SUCCESS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.16, 2010, issue 1
Jaime Lester