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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Print: 1072-8325
ISSN Online: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2020029561
pages 177-197

UNDERGRADUATE STEM LEADERSHIP: UNDERSTANDING THE GENDER GAP IN SELF-RATED LEADERSHIP ABILITY BY EXPLORING WOMEN'S MEANING-MAKING

Jennifer Blaney
Northern Arizona University

ABSTRACT

Despite the strides women have made in higher education, they remain underrepresented in both leadership positions and certain STEM disciplines. Using a feminist phenomenological framework, this paper explores how women in computing—one of the least diverse STEM fields—make meaning of their leadership, providing insight into the way researchers interpret gender inequities in leadership, STEM, and self-ratings.

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