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Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology
IF: 1.625 5-Year IF: 1.63 SJR: 0.402 SNIP: 0.613 CiteScore™: 2.3

ISSN Print: 0731-8898
ISSN Online: 2162-6537

Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology

DOI: 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.v29.i1.30
pages 7-11

Nursing Home Fractures: A Challenge and a Solution

Richard Edlich
Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emanual Hospital; and Plastic Surgery, Biomedical Engineering and Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, USA
Shelley S. Mason
Multiple Sclerosis Research Fund, Brush Prairie, WA, USA
Erin M. Swainston
MS Research Fund, Brush Prairie, WA
Jill J. Dahlstrom
Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center, Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
K. Dean Gubler
Surgical Critical Care, Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center for Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
William B. Long III
Trauma Specialists LLP, Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center for Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emmanuel Hospital Portland, OR, USA

ABSTRACT

Hip fracture occurrences in nursing homes are associated with high morbidity, mortality, and high health care costs in elderly people. In the United States, approximately 340,000 hip fractures occur each year, while more then 90% are associated with falls. Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder causing impaired bone strength that increases the risk of fracture. In the United States alone, osteoporosis affects < 10 million individuals aged ≥ 50. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), North American Menopause Society (NAMS), and National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) have developed recommendations for the identification of patients with osteoporosis who need therapy. Good nutrition with adequate supplements of calcium and vitamin D3 is considered one of the most important lifestyle factors for maintaining adequate bone mineral density. Only a combination of calcium and vitamin D therapy has been shown to increase the bone mineral density as well as a reduction in the nonvertebral fractures.


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