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Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology
IF: 1.241 5-Year IF: 1.349 SJR: 0.356 SNIP: 0.613 CiteScore™: 1.61

ISSN Print: 0731-8898
ISSN Online: 2162-6537

Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology

DOI: 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.2013004670
pages 219-228

The Influence of Nonprotein Thiols on DNA Damage Induced by Bleomycin in Single Human Cells

Anabela Mira
Laboratorio de Citogenetica y Mutagenesis, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular, La Plata, Argentina; Becaria de posgrado de la Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientffica y Tecnologica (ANPCyT)
Juan A. Gili
Laboratorio de Epidemiologia Genetica, Estudio Colaborativo Latinoamericano de Malformaciones Congenitas−Centro de Educacfon Medica e Investigaciones Clinicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Becario de posgrado tipo I 2008, CONICET
Daniel M. Lopez-Larraza
Laboratorio de Citogenetica y Mutagenesis, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular, La Plata, Argentina; Miembro de la Carrera del Investigador Cientifico del CONICET

ABSTRACT

Nonprotein thiols are considered radioprotectors, preventing DNA damage by ionizing radiation. Because bleomycin (BLM) is a radiomimetic agent, it was proposed that thiols may prevent DNA damage produced by this antibiotic. However, results obtained with treatments combining thiols and BLM in living cells are contradictory. The goal of this study was to analyze the DNA damage induced by BLM and the influence of 3 nonprotein thiols of different electrical charges and chemical compositions at the level of single cells (comet assay). We also studied the morphological signs of apoptosis produced by BLM in these same conditions. We found that all thiols potentiated DNA damage induced by BLM, most probably by reactivating the BLM complex once it generated free radicals. Cysteamine (positive) potentiated BLM action the most, glutathione (negative) potentiated this antibiotic the least, whereas cysteine had an intermediate effect compared with the other two.


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