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International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion
ESCI SJR: 0.142 SNIP: 0.16 CiteScore™: 0.29

ISSN Print: 2150-766X
ISSN Online: 2150-7678

International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion

DOI: 10.1615/IntJEnergeticMaterialsChemProp.v5.i1-6.170
pages 146-160

BURNING RATE DATA REDUCTION OF SMALL-SCALE TEST MOTORS

A. DeNigris
Laboratorio di Termofisica, Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan, Mi, Italy
C. Morandi
Laboratorio di Termofisica, Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan, Mi, Italy
F. Pace
Laboratorio di Termofisica, Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan, Mi, Italy
A. Ratti
Laboratorio di Termofisica, Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan, Mi, Italy
M. Servieri
Laboratorio di Termofisica, Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan, Mi, Italy
A. Annovazzi
Fiat Avio - Comprensorio BPD, Colleferro, Rm, Italy
E. Tosti
Fiat Avio - Comprensorio BPD, Colleferro, Rm, Italy
R. O. Hessler
Somerville, AL, USA and Rensselaer, IN, USA
R. L. Glick
Somerville, AL, USA and Rensselaer, IN, USA

ABSTRACT

Small-scale solid rocket motors are routinely fired by propulsion industries to measure propellant burning rates for research and development of new propellants, quality control during manufacturing, and service life (aging). A Working Group of the NATO Advanced Vehicle Technology Panel has recently completed a 3-year study in this area. The purpose was to analyze the many procedures employed to deduce burning rates from test motor pressure traces and thus lead to an improved control of manufacturing and aging processes. For a matter of time, the Working Group activities have concentrated on ideal (computer generated) pressure traces and less on real world pressure traces (obscured by imperfect measurements including variations in motor manufacture, variations in motor operation, instrumentation noise, etc.). In this paper, both computer-simulated and experimental pressure traces from industrial small-scale test motors are examined. Several data reduction methods based on the thickness-over-time definition, used by leading European companies, have been applied. In treating simulated pressure traces, the Hessler and Glick two-point procedure provided the best results among all thickness-over-time methods; but had to be modified for real motor applications.


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