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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.332 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.2014010946
pages 151-162

Hydrogel Encapsulation to Improve Cell Viability during Syringe Needle Flow

Matthew A. Wagner
Harvard University, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts
William H. Marks
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA 02138
Sujata K. Bhatia
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138

ABSTRACT

This work examines pluronic F-127 poloxamer for cell protection during injection through a syringe needle. Direct cell injection is a minimally invasive method for cell transplantation; however, it often results in poor cell viability. We proposed that encapsulating cells in this hydrogel would protect cells from detrimental mechanical forces during injection and increase cell viability. The hydrogel was tested at multiple weights and carbon nanobrush concentrations to determine how gel weight affects cell viability as well as to allow the gels to remain as electrically conductive scaffolds. This work assessed the ability of the hydrogel to prevent cell membrane bursting. We used D1 multipotent mouse bone marrow stromal precursor cells for this study. We found that the pressure drop increases with increasing weight of the gels. However, cell viability also increases as the weight of the gels increases. These results support the proposition that hydrogels can be used to protect cells during syringe needle injection. Since these hydrogels undergo a reverse phase transition, the gels can be used to transplant cells into the body in solution form through injection. The gels will then harden in situ to allow for cell proliferation and tissue regeneration at the desired site.