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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v14.i6.30
12 pages

Biomaterials for Use in Frontal Sinus Obliteration

Matthew D'Addario
University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry, Lexington KY 40536-0297
Richard H. Haug
Professor of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, Executive Associate Dean, Div.Chief Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center College of Dentistry, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
Reena M. Talwar
University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry, Lexington KY 40536-0297

ABSTRACT

Although fractures of the frontal sinus are infrequent (2−15% of victims of facial trauma), because of their proximity to the brain and eyes, the consequences of their management may have a significant impact on the patient. For frontal sinus injuries that affect the nasofrontal ducts or posterior wall, obliteration is indicated. Although frontal sinus surgery has been documented since 1750, a consensus as to the best material for obliteration has not been achieved. The particular autogenous and alloplastic materials for use in frontal sinus obliteration will be the focus of this review, with particular attention paid to assessing their physical properties, advantages, disadvantages, and complications. While numerous new alloplastic materials show promise for frontal sinus obliteration, autogenous fat remains the most popular and most frequently used material with the longest history of use, and it is versatile and reliable.