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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.332 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v10.i4.70
10 pages

Biomechanical Performance of Silicone and Latex External Condom Catheters

Robin Williams
Department of Plastic Surgery, Box 800376, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA 22908
Richard Edlich
Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emanual Hospital; and Plastic Surgery, Biomedical Engineering and Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, USA
Trimble Bailey
Department of Plastic Surgery, Box 800376, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA 22908
Sheryl A. Pine
Department of Plastic Surgery, Box 800376, University of Virginia Health Systems, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908-0376
George T. Rodeheaver
Plastic Surgery Research Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA
William D. Steers
J. Y. Gillenwater Professor of Urology; Chairman, Department of Urology. University of Virginia Health System P.O. Box 800422 Charlottesville VA 22908

ABSTRACT

Standard in vivo biomechanical performance tests and a pilot clinical study of latex external condom catheters (ECCs) and silicone ECCs demonstrated the superior performance of the silicone ECC over that of the latex ECC. The silicone ECC has a self-adhesive that binds more securely to human skin than the self-adhesive of latex ECC. In addition, the moisture vapor transmission through silicone is significantly greater than through latex. The aggressive self-adhesive of the silicone ECC significantly reduced ECC catheter pop-off compared to that of latex ECC. Silicone ECC removal can be facilitated by the application of a warm, wet cloth to the exterior surface of the silicone ECC, which significantly reduces its self-adhesive force. Constant, gentle traction is then applied to the silicone catheter outlet end to achieve atraumatic silicone ECC removal. On the basis of the results of these standardized tests and pilot study, the silicone ECC is recommended for incontinent men without obstructive uropathy.