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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.332 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v12.i4.40
8 pages

A Nationwide Followup Study of Autoimmune and Connective Tissue Disease Among Hip and Knee Implant Patients

Lisa B. Signorello
International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, Maryland; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt—Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee
Weimin Ye
Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt—Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee
Jon P. Fryzek
1International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, Maryland; 2Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt—Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee
William J. Blot
International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, Maryland; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt—Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Loren Lipworth
International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, Maryland; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt—Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee
Joseph K. McLaughlin
Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt Medical School, President, International Epidemiology Institute, 1455 Research Blvd., Suite 550, Rockville, Maryland, 20850-3127, USA
Olof Nyren
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

ABSTRACT

Because implants can provoke varied immune system responses, we assessed whether hip and knee implant recipients had an increased risk of autoimmune/connective tissue diseases (AI/CTDs). Using national registry data from Sweden, we compared hospitalization rates for AI/CTDs in 101,771 hip and 23,891 knee implant recipients to rates in the general population. Hip patients were followed up to 22 years and knee patients up to 14 years postimplantation. Our findings indicate that it is unlikely that hip or knee implantation results in any increased risk for most AI/CTDs. After long-term followup, the associations we observed with polyarteritis nodosa and fibrositis could be the basis for future investigations.