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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.145 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v22.i2.50
pages 145-155

The Influence of Absorbable Subcuticular Staples, Continuous Subcuticular Absorbable Suture, and Percutaneous Metal Skin Staples on Infection in Contaminated Wounds

Angela Pineros-Fernandez
Research Assistant in Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
Lisa S. Salopek
Plastic Surgery Research, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia USA 22908-1351
Pamela F. Rodeheaver
Research Assistant in Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
George T. Rodeheaver
Plastic Surgery Research Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

ABSTRACT

Wound infection is a threatening, troublesome, and costly complication contributing to increased mortality and morbidity. The methods and materials used to close a wound significantly influence the quality of the repair process and the risk of surgical site infection. Six pigs were used to evaluate the influence of four separate skin-closure modalities on the potentiation of infection in contaminated wounds. Full-thickness skin wounds on the abdomen were contaminated with S. aureus and then closed with one of four devices: a novel absorbable staple (InsorbTM) placed in the subcuticular tissue; a braided absorbable suture (VicrylTM); a monofilament absorbable suture (MonocrylTM); percutaneous metal staples. Wound infection was assessed 7 days after closure by clinical signs and quantitative bacterial swabs. InsorbTM staples had significantly lower infection rates than continuous VicrylTM (39% vs. 100%, p=0.002) or MonocrylTM suture (39% vs. 89%, p=0.014). The InsorbTM subcuticular staple and the metal percutaneous skin staple were statistically equivalent in wound infection rate and parameters of inflammation. The combined data for both interrupted staple modalities documented less inflammation compared to the combined data for continuous sutures. These lower levels of inflammatory metrics were statistically significant for edema (p=0.018), gauze exudate observed (p=0.007) and purulent exudate in wound (p<0.0001). In conclusion, InsorbTM staples were shown to be an acceptable choice for the closure of contaminated wounds because they had a significantly lower incidence of wound infection and inflammation when compared to continuous intradermal suture.


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