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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.332 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.2015013409
pages 337-343

Static and Dynamic Bracing for Loss of Motion Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

Todd P. Pierce
Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland
Jeffery J. Cherian
Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland
Michael A. Mont
Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland

ABSTRACT

Pain and dysfunction leading to decreased range-of-motion following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a common complication that may require treatment beyond standard rehabilitation efforts. In this review, we discuss the use of static and dynamic stretch devices to treat these range-of-motion dysfunctions. There are two mechanisms by which these devices work: dynamic stretch applies a constant low force, which allows for a variable soft-tissue displacement as they stretch, and static progressive stretch increases displacement, which allows for a constant displacement at a variable force leading to tissue stress relaxation. The uses of both devices have been reported to be effective in treating range-of-motion dysfunction after TKA. These devices are excellent options for the treatment of TKA stiffness, but they may undergo even further refinement in the future, as more information about exact indications and device modification emerge.