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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v16.i2.20
pages 131-144

Bone Contact Around Osseointegrated Implants: A Histologic Study of Acid-Etched and Machined Surfaces

Adriano Piattelli
Professor of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Dean and Director of Studies and Research, Dental School, University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy
Renato Celletti
University "G. D'Annunzio" Chieti-Pescara, Dental School, Italy
Vanessa C. Marinho
University of Southern California, School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA
Tonino Traini
University "G. D'Annunzio" Chieti-Pescara, Dental School, Italy
Giovanna Orsini
University "G. D'Annunzio" Chieti-Pescara, Dental School, Italy
Guido Bracchetti
Private Practice in Milan, Italy
Vittoria Perrotti
University "G. D'Annunzio" Chieti-Pescara, Dental School, Italy

ABSTRACT

Current literature reports that surface acid etching can improve bone−implant contact (BIC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences of BIC between acid-etched (Osseotite) and machined surface implants.
Six white New Zealand mature rabbits were used in the present investigation. Each rabbit received two implants, specially made with two surfaces on it (one acid-etched and one machined) into each tibia. A total of 24 implants were inserted. Two animals each were killed at 15, 30, and 60 days after implant placement. Histomorphometry of BIC was statistically evaluated.
The acid-etched surfaces showed a greater bone contact percentage than the machined ones during the early phase of healing (15 days), which was not statistically significant. On the other hand, after 30 and 60 days, the differences of BIC between acid-etched and machined surfaces were statistically significant. The acid-etched surface appears to improve BIC at a later stage of healing.