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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.332 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Print: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.2013006244
pages 211-218

Long-Term In Vivo Effect of Peg Bone Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

Brandon Engebretson
School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, Bioengineering Center, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019
Vassilios I. Sikavitsas
School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, Bioengineering Center, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019

ABSTRACT

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) performs multiple roles for bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Successful in vivo implantation for long periods of time requires a scaffold that is biocompatible, osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and promotes cell recruitment and attachment. PEG has significant advantages such as excellent biocompatibility and flexibility, but certain drawbacks such as poor mechanical strength and cell attachment limit its use as a plain scaffold. Instead, it is often used as an additive, composite, or delivery system. Below is a summary of current research involving the use of PEG-based biomaterials in bone tissue engineering, specifically with regard to long term in vivo effects.