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Critical Reviews™ in Immunology
IF: 1.352 5-Year IF: 3.347 SJR: 0.657 SNIP: 0.55 CiteScore™: 2.19

ISSN Print: 1040-8401
ISSN Online: 2162-6472

Critical Reviews™ in Immunology

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevImmunol.2018026540
pages 279-301

Sensing Self and Non-Self DNA by Innate Immune Receptors and Their Signaling Pathways

Sophia P. M. Sok
Laboratory of Molecular Immunobiology, Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Nara, Japan; Institute of Postgraduate Studies (IPS), University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Centre of Research in Biotechnology for Agriculture (CEBAR), University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Daisuke Ori
Laboratory of Molecular Immunobiology, Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Nara, Japan
Noor Hasima Nagoor
Centre of Research in Biotechnology for Agriculture (CEBAR), University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Institute of Biological Sciences (Genetics and Molecular Biology), Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Taro Kawai
Laboratory of Molecular Immunobiology, Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Nara, Japan

ABSTRACT

The innate immune system serves as the first line of defense to protect the host from pathogen infection. As a first step, the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as non-self DNA derived from pathogens, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), such as self DNA released from damaged or injured cells. Sensing of such DNAs elicits innate immune responses through the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and proinflammatory cytokines resulting from the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), respectively. These cytokines are key players in interlinking innate and adaptive immune responses. However, defects in DNA sensors and their signaling cascades lead to dysregulation of immune responses, autoimmune diseases, and cancer progression. Here we provide an update on DNA signaling pathways in response to pathogen infection and cell injury, and on the roles of regulators in governing the immune system and maintaining host homeostasis. We also discuss the evasion of immunosurveillance by pathogens.


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