Library Subscription: Guest
Begell Digital Portal Begell Digital Library eBooks Journals References & Proceedings Research Collections
High Temperature Material Processes: An International Quarterly of High-Technology Plasma Processes

Impact factor: 0.058

ISSN Print: 1093-3611
ISSN Online: 1940-4360

High Temperature Material Processes: An International Quarterly of High-Technology Plasma Processes

DOI: 10.1615/HighTempMatProc.v8.i3.100
pages 447-459

CONDUCTIVITY OF NONIDEAL PLASMA

Vladimir Evgenievich Fortov
Joint Institute of High Temperatures RAS, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow, Russia
V. B. Mintsev
Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Chernogolovka, 142432 Russia
V. Ya. Ternovoi
Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Chemogolovka, 142432 Russia
V. K. Gryaznov
Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Chemogolovka, 142432 Russia
I. L. Iosilevskii
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 141700, Russia
M. A. Mochalov
Institute for Experimental Physics, VNIIEF, Sarov, 607190 Russia
M. V. Zhernokletov
Institute for Experimental Physics, VNIIEF, Sarov, 607190 Russia

ABSTRACT

Physical properties of hot dense matter at hundreds GPa pressures are considered. The new experimental results on pressure ionization of hot matter generated by multiple shock compression of hydrogen and noble gases are presented. The low-frequency electrical conductivity of shock compressed hydrogen, helium, and xenon plasmas was measured in the hundred GPa range of pressures. To reduce effects of irreversible heating and implement a quasi-isentropic regime, strongly compressed matter was generated by the method of multiple shock compression in planar and cylindrical geometries. As a result, plasma states at pressures in the hundred GPa range were realized, where the electron concentration could be as high ne ∼ 2×1023 cm−3, which may correspond to either a degenerate or a Boltzmann plasma characterized by a strong Coulomb and a strong inter-atomic interaction. A sharp increase (by three to five orders of magnitude) in the electrical conductivity of strongly nonideal plasma, due to pressure ionization, was recorded, and theoretical models were invoked to describe this increase. Opposite effect was observed for lithium compressed by multiple shock up to pressures ∼ 200 GPa, where electrical conductivity was sharply decreased as pressure increased.