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Plasma Medicine
SJR: 0.198 SNIP: 0.183 CiteScore™: 0.57

ISSN Print: 1947-5764
ISSN Online: 1947-5772

Plasma Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/PlasmaMed.2016018618
pages 135-177

Aqueous Plasma Pharmacy: Preparation Methods, Chemistry, and Therapeutic Applications

Jessica M. Joslin
Symbios Technologies, Inc., 3185 Rampart Road, Bldg. A, Colorado State University Research Innovation Center, Fort Collins, CO 80523
James R. McCall
Symbios Technologies, Inc., 3185 Rampart Road, Bldg. A, Colorado State University Research Innovation Center, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Justin P. Bzdek
Symbios Technologies, Inc., 3185 Rampart Road, Bldg. A, Colorado State University Research Innovation Center, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Derek C. Johnson
Symbios Technologies, Inc., 3185 Rampart Road, Bldg. A, Colorado State University Research Innovation Center, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Brooks M. Hybertson
Symbios Technologies, Inc., 3185 Rampart Road, Bldg. A, Colorado State University Research Innovation Center, Fort Collins, CO 80523; Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045

ABSTRACT

Plasma pharmacy is a subset of the broader field of plasma medicine. Although not strictly defined, the term aqueous plasma pharmacy (APP) is used to refer to the generation and distribution of reactive plasma-generated species in an aqueous solution followed by subsequent administration for therapeutic benefits. APP attempts to harness the therapeutic effects of plasma-generated oxidant species within aqueous solution in various applications, such as disinfectant solutions, cell proliferation related to wound healing, and cancer treatment. The subsequent use of plasma-generated solutions in the APP approach facilitates the delivery of reactive plasma species to internal locations within the body. Although significant efforts in the field of plasma medicine have concentrated on employing direct plasma plume exposure to cells or tissues, here we focus specifically on plasma discharge in aqueous solution to render the solution biologically active for subsequent application. Methods of plasma discharge in solution are reviewed, along with aqueous plasma chemistry and the applications for APP. The future of the field also is discussed regarding necessary research efforts that will enable commercialization for clinical deployment.