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Plasma Medicine
SJR: 0.278 SNIP: 0.183 CiteScore™: 0.57

ISSN Print: 1947-5764
ISSN Online: 1947-5772

Plasma Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/PlasmaMed.2011003130
pages 115-133

Amine-Rich Cell-Culture Surfaces for Research in Orthopedic Medicine

Fackson Mwale
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, McGill University, and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Canada
Sonia Rampersad
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, McGill University, and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Canada
Juan-Carlos Ruiz
Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique, Montreal, Canada
Pierre-Luc Girard-Lauriault
Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique, Montreal, Canada
Alain Petit
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, McGill University, and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Canada
John Antoniou
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, McGill University, and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Canada
Sophie Lerouge
Department of Mechanical Engineering, École de Technologie Supérieure (ÉTS), Canada
Michael Wertheimer
Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique, Montreal, CANADA

ABSTRACT

We report results of ongoing research relating to cell immobilization and cell culture on bioactive organic coatings deposited using three different techniques−two plasma assisted, the third based on vacuum-ultraviolet photo-polymerization. We start by briefly comparing those three methods and by describing some of the key characteristics of the resulting coatings; all are designed to be rich in primary amines, a functional group known to be highly bioactive. Next, we focus on two cell types of importance to long-term objectives in our orthopedic research laboratory: (i) The first, nonadherent human U937 monocytes, is a cell line that has been widely used as a model of the mammalian cellular response to various inflammatory stimuli, and in understanding the clinical relevance of elevated cobalt and chromium levels in patients with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty and hip resurfacing arthroplasty. (ii) The second cell type, adherent human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), derived from patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA), is important in biological repair of cartilage and of the degenerate intervertebral disc (IVD) from the patients' autologous cells. Much progress has been achieved in both cases, as illustrated with results based to a considerable extent on real-time reverse-transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a key methodology used in this type of research.