Library Subscription: Guest
Begell Digital Portal Begell Digital Library eBooks Journals References & Proceedings Research Collections
Atomization and Sprays
IF: 1.262 5-Year IF: 1.518 SJR: 0.814 SNIP: 1.18 CiteScore™: 1.6

ISSN Print: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

Volumes:
Volume 29, 2019 Volume 28, 2018 Volume 27, 2017 Volume 26, 2016 Volume 25, 2015 Volume 24, 2014 Volume 23, 2013 Volume 22, 2012 Volume 21, 2011 Volume 20, 2010 Volume 19, 2009 Volume 18, 2008 Volume 17, 2007 Volume 16, 2006 Volume 15, 2005 Volume 14, 2004 Volume 13, 2003 Volume 12, 2002 Volume 11, 2001 Volume 10, 2000 Volume 9, 1999 Volume 8, 1998 Volume 7, 1997 Volume 6, 1996 Volume 5, 1995 Volume 4, 1994 Volume 3, 1993 Volume 2, 1992 Volume 1, 1991

Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.v17.i3.30
pages 267-287

ROLE OF VISCOSITY ON TRAJECTORY OF LIQUID JETS IN A CROSS-AIRFLOW

Madjid Birouk
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 5V6 Canada
C. O. Iyogun
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 5V6 Canada
Neil Popplewell
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 5V6 Canada

ABSTRACT

The effect of liquid viscosity on the penetration and trajectory of a jet in a low subsonic cross-airflow was investigated experimentally. An open-loop wind tunnel was used to generate an airstream in a square cross-sectional test section. Liquid was injected downward through a nozzle that was flush with the top inner surface of the test section. A wide range of experimental conditions was achieved by varying the nozzle diameter, momentum flux ratio, and liquid viscosity. The study revealed that viscosity has distinct effects on the initial part of the liquid column and in the jet's far-field stream. It was shown that far from the nozzle exit, the jet's penetration increased initially as the liquid viscosity increased, but a further increase in viscosity reduced the penetration. On the other hand, close to the nozzle exit, although the effect of liquid viscosity was not obvious, it was generally observed that with the exception of the highest viscosity employed here, the jet's penetration decreased as the viscosity increased. An empirical jet trajectory correlation was proposed to account for the combined effects of viscosity, momentum flux ratio, and nozzle diameter.


Articles with similar content:

UNIFORMITY OF SWIRLED SPRAYS FORMED WITH NOZZLES OF VARYING SURFACE ROUGHNESS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.9, 1999, issue 5
K. Ramamurthi, R. Patnaik
DROPLET FORMATION WITH SINGLE AND MULTIPLE NODES FROM A LIQUID JET IN IMMISCIBLE LIQUIDS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.7, 1997, issue 4
Tapas K. Das
EFFECT OF SKEWNESS ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF IMPINGING JET ATOMIZERS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.19, 2009, issue 1
Hrishikesh Gadgil, B. N. Raghunandan
EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZATION OF HIGH-VISCOSITY FLUIDS: PART I. NEWTONIAN LIQUIDS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.1, 1991, issue 3
Paul E. Sojka, Harry N. Buckner
CHARACTERISTICS OF ADHESION DIESEL FUEL ON AN IMPINGEMENT DISK WALL PART 2: DROPLET WEBER NUMBER AND ADHERED FUEL MASS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.24, 2014, issue 8
Masataka Arai, Yoshio Zama, Tomohiko Furuhata, Mohd Zaid Akop