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Atomization and Sprays

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ISSN Print: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

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Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.2013008642
pages 251-272

TIME-RESOLVED X-RAY RADIOGRAPHY OF SPRAYS FROM ENGINE COMBUSTION NETWORK SPRAY A DIESEL INJECTORS

Alan L. Kastengren
Energy Systems Division, X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
F. Zak Tilocco
Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
Daniel J. Duke
Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
Christopher F. Powell
Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
Xusheng Zhang
X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA
Seoksu Moon
Department of Mechanical System Engineering, University of Hiroshima, Japan; X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

ABSTRACT

A significant hurdle to the understanding of sprays is the link between nozzle geometry and the fluid distribution in the spray. X-ray radiography can help to clarify this link by providing quantitative measurements of the spray density in the near-nozzle region, including at the exit plane. The current work describes x-ray radiography measurements performed at Argonne National Laboratory under the "Spray A" conditions of the Engine Combustion Network. Four injector samples have been studied, and model-dependent reconstructions have been used to generate 3D maps of the average fuel density as a function of time. These measurements reveal differences between the sprays from nominally identical injectors that can be interpreted in terms of previously measured geometric differences in the injector nozzles.