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Atomization and Sprays
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ISSN Print: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

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Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.v12.i123.30
pages 49-67

BREAKUP AND ATOMIZATION OF A KEROSENE JET IN CROSSFLOWAT ELEVATED PRESSURE

Julian Becker
DLR—German Aerospace Center, Institute of Propulsion Technology, Cologne, Germany
Christoph Hassa
German Aerospace Center−DLR, Institute of Propulsion Technology, Linder Hohe, 51147 Cologne, Germany

ABSTRACT

The breakup, penetration, and atomization of a plain jet of kerosene jet A-1 fuel in a nonswirling crossflow of air 'were investigated experimentally at test conditions relevant to lean, premised, pre-vaporized (LPP) combustion for gas turbines. Measurement techniques employed include time-resolved shadowgraphs, Mie-scattering laser lightsheets, and phase Doppler anemometry (PDA). The nozzle diameter was 0.45 mm and its L/D ratio was 1.56. Air velocities lay between 50 and 100 m/s, the air pressure range extended from 1.5 to 15 bar, and the air temperature was around 290 К. Fuel flow rates were chosen so that the fuel-to-air momentum flux ratio q(= rliqU2liq/rairU2air assumed mainly values between 2 and 18. Two different mechanisms of jet breakup could be discerned, and correlations for the jet penetration and lateral dispersion close to the nozzle were derived. Furthermore, the penetration of the spray plume and its representative droplet diameters were determined. Finally, a simple, approximate model to predict liquid fuel penetration is presented.


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