Library Subscription: Guest
Begell Digital Portal Begell Digital Library eBooks Journals References & Proceedings Research Collections
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression
IF: 2.156 5-Year IF: 2.255 SJR: 0.649 SNIP: 0.599 CiteScore™: 3

ISSN Print: 1045-4403
ISSN Online: 2162-6502

Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevEukaryotGeneExpr.2015013057
pages 145-152

Adipose-Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells: Update on Clinical Utility and Efficacy

Seongho Han
Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan, Republic of Korea
Hyun Min Sun
Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Republic of Korea
Ki-Chul Hwang
Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Republic of Korea
Sung-Whan Kim
Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung, Republic of Korea

ABSTRACT

Adipose tissue has emerged as an attractive cell source in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine because it can be easily collected and enriched with stem/progenitor cell populations. The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) derived from adipose tissue contains heterogeneous cell populations such as mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells, preadipocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes, T cells, and M2 macrophages. SVF-derived mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells can be easily expanded in vitro and have the potential to create diverse lineages of cells. Although there have been issues related to their isolation and purification, SVF cells demonstrate regenerative potential in damaged tissues or organs through paracrine and differentiation mechanisms. Furthermore, SVF cells augment immunological tolerance by promoting inhibitory macrophages and T regulatory cells and by decreasing ongoing inflammation. Numerous implantations of freshly isolated, autologous adipose tissue-derived SVF cells in cosmetic surgeries and in a wide variety of other specialties support the safety of SVF cells and have accelerated their clinical application. Despite these attractive advantages of SVF cells in clinical interventions, to our knowledge the recent status of clinical studies of various diseases has not been fully investigated. Therefore this article describes recent advances in the clinical use of SVF cells, as well as the associated challenges and future directions for this field of research. We also speculate that verification of the efficacy and safety of SVF cells requires more basic experimental research, using a standard isolation protocol, and larger randomized clinical trials of the utility of SVF cells in various diseases.


Articles with similar content:

Factors Influencing the Long-Term Behavior of Extracellular Matrix-Derived Scaffolds for Musculoskeletal Soft Tissue Repair
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.22, 2012, issue 3
Christopher R. Rowland, Farshid Guilak, Dianne Little
Cell Death Induction in Cancer Therapy − Past, Present, and Future
Critical Reviews™ in Oncogenesis, Vol.21, 2016, issue 3-4
Marc-Eric Halatsch, Sebastian Hasslacher, Klaus-Michael Debatin, Oliver Brühl, Julia Zimmermann, Katia La Ferla-Brühl, Lisa Nonnenmacher, Timo Burster, Mike-Andrew Westhoff, Sara E. Barry, Markus D. Siegelin, Georg Karpel-Massler
Gene Expression in Stem Cells
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.19, 2009, issue 4
Yu Liang, Criss Walworth, Iain Russell, Caifu Chen
Gene Expression in Pulmonary Fibrosis
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.18, 2008, issue 1
Eileen Hsu, Hidekata Yasuoka, Carol A. Feghali-Bostwick
Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering of Cartilage
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, Vol.12, 2002, issue 3
J. M. Bezemer, C. A. van Blitterswijk, J. Riesle, T. B. F. Woodfield, J. S. Pieper