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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.v19.i3.70
pages 249-255

Vitamin D2 Stability During the Refrigerated Storage of Ultraviolet B−Treated Cultivated Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms

Aneta Slawinska
Department of Fruits, Vegetables and Mushrooms Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Emilia Fornal
Laboratory of Separation and Spectroscopic Method Applications, Center for Interdisciplinary Research, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Wojciech Radzki
Department of Fruits, Vegetables and Mushrooms Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Ewa Jablonska-Rys
Department of Fruits, Vegetables and Mushrooms Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Ewa Parfieniuk
Laboratory of Separation and Spectroscopic Method Applications, Center for Interdisciplinary Research, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland

ABSTRACT

The effects of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on the synthesis of vitamin D2 and its stability during refrigerated storage was determined in fresh cultivated culinary-medicinal mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Lentinus edodes) after harvest. The irradiated mushrooms were stored at 4°C for up to 10 days. The concentrations of vitamin D2 and ergosterol were determined using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The cultivated mushrooms not treated with UVB were devoid of vitamin D2. After UVB irradiation, we obtained mushrooms with a large amount of ergocalciferol. A. bisporus showed the lowest vitamin D2 content (3.55 ± 0.11 μg D2/g dry weight); P. ostreatus contained 58.96 ± 1.15 μg D2/g dry weight, and L. edodes contained 29.46 ± 2.21 μg/g dry weight. During storage at 4°C, the amount of vitamin D2 was gradually decreased in P. ostreatus and L. edodes, whereas in A. bisporus vitamin D2 gradually increased until the sixth day, then decreased. Mushrooms exposed to UVB radiation contain a significant amount of vitamin D2 and are therefore an excellent food source of vitamin D.