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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.433 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v13.i6.10
pages 493-504

Comparative Study of Hemagglutination and Lectin Activity in Australian Medicinal Mushrooms (Higher Basidiomycetes)

Razina Rouf
Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222, Australia
Evelin Tiralongo
School of Pharmacy, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222, Australia
Anja Krahl
Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222, Australia
Karen Maes
Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222, Australia
Lina Spaan
Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222, Australia
Stefan Wolf
Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222, Australia
Tom W. May
Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne, South Yarra, Victoria 3141, Australia
Joe Tiralongo
Institute for Glycomics, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222, Australia

ABSTRACT

Fifteen Australian mushroom species (higher Basidiomycetes) were assessed for hemagglutination and lectin activity. Hemagglutination activity was evaluated using both neuraminidase treated and untreated rabbit and human A, B, and O erythrocytes. Lectin activity was determined by the ability of various mono- and oligosaccharides to inhibit hemagglutination activity. Of the mushrooms evaluated, seven contained lectin activity. However, five (Agaricus bitorquis, Chlorophyllum brunneum, Coprinus comatus, Cortinarius sp. TWM 1710, and Omphalotus nidiformis) expressed lectin activity in only one of two collections tested. The two remaining lectin active mushroom species (Phlebopus marginatus and Psathyrella asperospora) possessed lectin activity with the same sugar specificity in both collections. Although lectins were identified with diverse specificity, lactose-specific lectin activity was most frequently identified, being present in Agaricus bitorquis, Copronus comatus, Omphalotus nidiformis, and Phlebopus marginatus. In contrast, Psathyrella asperospora, Cortinarius sp. TWM 1710, and Chlorophyllum brunneum were found to possess lectin activity specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, galactose, and N-acetyl-neurammic acid, respectively. Significantly, the galactose-specific lectin activity identified in Cortinarius sp. TWM 1710 and the lactose-specific lectin activity in Phlebopus marginatus have not been previously reported.


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