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Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.117 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.17

ISSN Print: 0896-2960
ISSN Online: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.v24.i1-2.30
pages 51-67

Whole-body Vibration Training in Older Adults: Retention of the Strengthening Effects

Kelly M. Carr
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
Chantelle C. Lachance
Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Kenji A. Kenno
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Nancy McNevin
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
Sean Horton
Adapted Physical Exercise (APEX) Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario
Patricia L. Weir
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada

ABSTRACT

Our purpose was to determine if strength gains from 16 sessions of whole-body vibration (WBV) or resistance (RES) training persist for seniors after a four-week retention period. Participants included 46 community-dwelling seniors (mean age = 73.13 years; 27 males, 19 females). Baseline measures (T1) were taken following the training protocol. Measures included fitness testing, a physical abilities questionnaire, and an interview. Retention testing (T2) occurred after participants engaged in normal daily activities for four weeks. Statistical analyses included 2 (condition: WBV versus RES) × 2 (activity level: high versus low) × 2 (time: T1 versus T2) mixed factorial ANOVAs on each dependent measure. Participants in the RES group and those who were highly active performed better on the chair stand test. No significant findings were revealed in the remaining fitness measures. The questionnaire indicated that walking 0.5 miles was perceived as less difficult at T2 than at T1. Nearly all self-reported physical ability measures were perceived as less difficult for highly active participants. Strengthening effects acquired through WBV or RES training were maintained in seniors after a four-week retention period, regardless of condition or activity level. However, activity level influenced the perception of one's physical abilities.


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