Inscrição na biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digital Begell Biblioteca digital da Begell eBooks Diários Referências e Anais Coleções de pesquisa
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN On-line: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v17.i1.30
pages 11-27

WOMEN IN GRADUATE ENGINEERING: IS DIFFERENTIAL DROPOUT A FACTOR IN THEIR UNDER REPRESENTATION AMONG ENGINEERING DOCTORATES?

S. Aki Hosoi
Colorado State University
Silvia Sara Canetto
Department of Psychology, Colorado State University

RESUMO

In the United States, women represent at most 20% of doctoral-level engineers. Differential dropout has been proposed as an explanation, but few studies have tested this theory for women in graduate engineering programs. Additionally, past research has not taken into consideration how the influx of foreign students into graduate engineering programs may affect women's proportionate enrollment and degree completion. To address these gaps, this study examined factors associated with enrollment and degree completion of female and male students (n = 470) in graduate engineering programs at a state university between 1990 and 2004. Women comprised 14% of graduate engineering students, but were as likely as men to complete doctoral degrees when factors associated with graduation (e.g., final GPA, engineering field) were considered. Among U.S. citizens, women had higher rates of degree completion than men, while the opposite was observed for foreign nationals. If replicated across institutions, these findings suggest that differential enrollment, not differential dropout, is the dominant factor in women's underrepresentation among engineering doctorates. This study's findings also point to the importance of examining the intersection of gender and culture to understand and support engineering educational choices, persistence, and success.


Articles with similar content:

WOMEN AND GIRLS IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: UNDERSTANDING THE BARRIERS TO RECRUITMENT, RETENTION AND PERSISTENCE ACROSS THE EDUCATIONAL TRAJECTORY
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.12, 2006, issue 2-3
Natalie D. Enright Jerger, Elizabeth M. O'Callaghan
CLIMATE FOR RETENTION TO GRADUATION: A MIXED METHODS INVESTIGATION OF STUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.16, 2010, issue 4
Hesborn O. Wao, Kathryn M. Borman, Reginald S. Lee
GENDER AND DISCIPLINARY DIFFERENCES IN EXPERIENCES WITH INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.13, 2007, issue 4
Maura Borrego, Elizabeth Creamer
GENDER AND ETHNIC DIFFERENCES IN THE EXPERIENCES, ACHIEVEMENTS, AND EXPECTATIONS OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING MAJORS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.3, 1997, issue 3
Jerilee Grandy
THE ROLES OF THE PROTESTANT WORK ETHIC AND PERCEIVED IDENTITY COMPATIBILITY IN GRADUATE STUDENTS' FEELINGS AND ATTITUDES TOWARD STEM AND NON-STEM FIELDS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.22, 2016, issue 4
Marci Lobel, Ashley Lytle, Jiyun Elizabeth L. Shin, Bonita London, Lisa Rosenthal, Sheri R. Levy