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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN On-line: 1940-431X

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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v4.i2-3.110
pages 249-267

CLOSING THE GAP FOR GIRLS: GENDER DIFFERENCES IN TEACHERS' TECHNOLOGICAL ATTITUDES AND PROFICIENCY

Zoe A. Barley
Science and Mathematics Program Improvement, 306 Moore Hall, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5033
Cynthia C. Phillips
Science and Mathematics Program Improvement, 306 Moore Hall, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5033

RESUMO

Questions remain about whether the scientific career pipeline will begin to retain girls in larger numbers. Female teachers, as role models, are one factor that may influence girls' career decision making. The introduction of technology, which facilitates use of collaborative and reflective strategies more attractive to girls, can be expected to play an important role. This study was based on a survey of teachers in a rural county in the Midwest currently introducing technology in five districts. Teachers were asked about: (a) their attitudes, proficiency, and use of technology; (b) the supporting infrastructure in terms of equipment, software, and technical assistance; and (c) constructivist practices. Proficiency in and use of technology were higher at the high school level than elementary, especially for female teachers, despite similarities in attitudes and infrastructure. However, female elementary teachers are those who report highest use of constructivist practices. Thus, although technology is often provided first to secondary level teachers, those who might best use technology in support of best practice are at the elementary level.


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