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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN On-line: 1940-431X

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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v6.i4.50
24 pages

RETAINING WOMEN IN THE SCIENCES: EVIDENCE FROM DOUGLASS COLLEGE'S PROJECT SUPER

Jennifer L. Fisler
Department of Educational Psychology, Graduate School of Education, Rutgers University, 10 Seminary Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1180
John W. Young
Department of Educational Psychology, Graduate School of Education, Rutgers University, 10 Seminary Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1180
Jean L. Hein
Department of Educational Psychology, Graduate School of Education, Rutgers University, 10 Seminary Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1180

RESUMO

This article describes the findings of a study of Project SUPER, an intervention program at Douglass College designed to improve retention rates of undergraduate women in math, science, and engineering. Project SUPER is the component of the Douglass Project that is aimed specifically at lst-year students who demonstrate ability and interest in math, science, or engineering. Students were interviewed and surveyed in their 3rd and 4th years of college to gain their retrospective opinions about the program and to identify factors that differentiated students who persisted in math, science, or engineering majors from those who did not. Although some components of the program were cited as being more effective than others, we found that Project SUPER had a positive impact on the academic lives of the women who participated. Participants were more likely than nonparticipants to major in math, science, or engineering, and they stated that the research and mentoring experiences available to them allowed them to make earlier, more informed academic and career decisions.


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