Inscrição na biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digital Begell Biblioteca digital da Begell eBooks Diários Referências e Anais Coleções de pesquisa
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering
SJR: 0.207 SNIP: 0.376 CiteScore™: 0.79

ISSN Imprimir: 0278-940X
ISSN On-line: 1943-619X

Volumes:
Volume 47, 2019 Volume 46, 2018 Volume 45, 2017 Volume 44, 2016 Volume 43, 2015 Volume 42, 2014 Volume 41, 2013 Volume 40, 2012 Volume 39, 2011 Volume 38, 2010 Volume 37, 2009 Volume 36, 2008 Volume 35, 2007 Volume 34, 2006 Volume 33, 2005 Volume 32, 2004 Volume 31, 2003 Volume 30, 2002 Volume 29, 2001 Volume 28, 2000 Volume 27, 1999 Volume 26, 1998 Volume 25, 1997 Volume 24, 1996 Volume 23, 1995

Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevBiomedEng.v32.i56.20
34 pages

Gas Plasma Treatment: A New Approach to Surgery?

Eva Stoffels
Department of Physics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
Ingrid E. Kieft
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Raymond E. J. Sladek
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Ewout P. van der Laan
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Dick W. Slaaf
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

RESUMO

In this survey we analyse the status quo of gas plasma applications in medical sciences. Plasma is a partly ionized gas, which contains free charge carriers (electrons and ions), active radicals, and excited molecules. So-called nonthermal plasmas are particularly interesting, because they operate at relatively low temperatures and do not inflict thermal damage to nearby objects. In the past two decades nonthermal plasmas have made a revolutionary appearance in solid state processing technology. The recent trends focus on using plasmas in health care, for "processing" of medical equipment and even living tissues. The major goal of tissue treatment with plasmas is nondestructive surgery: controlled, high-precision removal of diseased sections with minimum damage to the organism. Furthermore, plasmas allow fast and efficient bacterial inactivation, which makes them suitable for sterilization of surgical tools and local disinfection of tissues. Much research effort must be undertaken before these techniques will become common in medicine, but it is expected that a novel approach to surgery will emerge from plasma science.


Articles with similar content:

The Sterilization Technology Research on the Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma
Plasma Medicine, Vol.2, 2012, issue 4
Chao Wang, Harm Tolner, B. Li, Guozhou Rao, Huina Zhao, Tao Jiang, Ang Li
Treatment of Microorganisms in Vegetables and Fruits by Gliding Arc
Plasma Medicine, Vol.4, 2014, issue 1-4
Mohamed El Shaer, M. Mobasher, A. Abdelghany
Biomedical applications of electric gas discharges
High Temperature Material Processes: An International Quarterly of High-Technology Plasma Processes, Vol.6, 2002, issue 2
Eva Stoffels
BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF ELECTRIC GAS DISCHARGES
High Temperature Material Processes: An International Quarterly of High-Technology Plasma Processes, Vol.15, 2011, issue 3
Eva Stoffels
Fast Blood Coagulation of Capillary Vessels by Cold Plasma: A Rat Ear Bleeding Model
Plasma Medicine, Vol.1, 2011, issue 3-4
Gregory Fridman, Danil Dobrynin, Kimberly Wasko, Alexander A. Fridman, Gary Friedman