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Plasma Medicine
SJR: 0.278 SNIP: 0.183 CiteScore™: 0.57

ISSN Imprimir: 1947-5764
ISSN On-line: 1947-5772

Plasma Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/PlasmaMed.2014012361
pages 231-244

Low-Temperature Plasma: An Effective Approach Against Candida albicans Biofilm

Juliana Aparecida Delben
Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Sao Paulo State University, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil; Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York
Ramiro Mendonca Murata
Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York
Xi Wei
Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York
Myrella Lessio Castro
Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York
Wirley Goncalves Assuncao
Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Sao Paulo State University, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
Nelson Renato Franca Alves da Silva
Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York
Simone Duarte
Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York

RESUMO

This study evaluated the antifungal potential of low-temperature plasma (LTP) on a 72-hour Candida albicans biofilm. A growth inhibition zone test was conducted with agar plates inoculated with C. albicans and submitted to LTP and argon application at 3 and 10 mm for 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds. The groups for biofilm assays were 60 seconds of LTP application with a tip-to-sample distance of 3 mm (LTP-3) and 10 mm (LTP-10); −application of only argon gas for 60 seconds with a tip-to-sample distance of 3 mm (Ar-3) and 10 mm (Ar-10); and no treatment. The C. albicans biofilm was grown on saliva-coated discs. The medium was replaced every 24 hours. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the proportion of live and dead cells, and variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM) showed biofilm/cell structure. No inhibition zone was observed for control and either Ar groups. For the LTP groups, a progressively increasing of inhibition zone diameter was observed for different treatment durations. The LTP-3 and LTP-10 groups presented higher proportions of dead cells compared with the Ar-3 and Ar-10 groups. VPSEM revealed cell perforations in the LTP-3 and LTP-10 groups. A short period of LTP exposure demonstrated an antifungal effect on C. albicans biofilm.


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