Inscrição na biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digital Begell Biblioteca digital da Begell eBooks Diários Referências e Anais Coleções de pesquisa
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
Fator do impacto: 1.423 FI de cinco anos: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Imprimir: 1521-9437
ISSN On-line: 1940-4344

Volumes:
Volume 21, 2019 Volume 20, 2018 Volume 19, 2017 Volume 18, 2016 Volume 17, 2015 Volume 16, 2014 Volume 15, 2013 Volume 14, 2012 Volume 13, 2011 Volume 12, 2010 Volume 11, 2009 Volume 10, 2008 Volume 9, 2007 Volume 8, 2006 Volume 7, 2005 Volume 6, 2004 Volume 5, 2003 Volume 4, 2002 Volume 3, 2001 Volume 2, 2000 Volume 1, 1999

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v13.i3.100
pages 299-305

Ethnomycological Studies of Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms in the Mount Cameroon Region (Cameroon, Africa)

Tonjock Rosemary Kinge
Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, University of Bamenda, Bambili, Cameroon
Ebai M. Tabi
Department of Plant and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63,South West Region, Cameroon
Afui M. Mih
Department of Plant and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63,South West Region, Cameroon
Egbe A. Enow
Department of Plant and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63,South West Region, Cameroon
L. Njouonkou
University of Yaoundé I, Faculty of Science, Laboratory of Cryptogamy, P.O. Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon
T. M. Nji
Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Letters and Social Sciences, University of Douala, P.O. Box 3132, Douala, Cameroon

RESUMO

Inhabitants of the Mount Cameroon region depend on the forest resources of the region for their livelihood, including the diverse use of macrofungi. With the increasing loss of forest due to exploitation and urbanization, they are liable to rapidly lose their indigenous knowledge of the forest resources, especially of mushrooms. An ethnomycological survey was conducted with the aim of documenting the indigenous knowledge of mushrooms as a prelude to conservation efforts. We also sought to assess the mycophilic and mycophobic tendencies of the inhabitants. It was revealed that traditionally, mushrooms were used as food, medicine, for mythological purposes, for aesthetics, and some poisonous species were also recorded. At least 15 different species were identified to be edible among the Bakweri people. Species used for ethnomedicine among the Bakweris belonged to several genera, including Termitomyces, Auricularia, Agaricus, Daldinia, Dictyophora, Pleurotus, Russula, Trametes, Chlorophyllum, and Ganoderma. Mushrooms were used as love charms, for dispelling evil spirits, and as part of cultural festivals.


Articles with similar content:

Edible Tribal Mushroom Resources of Central India and Their Ethnological Aspects
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.7, 2005, issue 3
Mahendra K. Rai, R. C. Rajak
Conservation of Medicinal Mushrooms in the V. L. Komarov Botanical Institute Basidiomycetes Culture Collection (LE-BIN, Russia)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.12, 2010, issue 2
Nadezhda V. Psurtseva
Molecular Systematics of Ganoderma: What Is Reishi?
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.7, 2005, issue 3
Jean-Marc Moncalvo
Ethnomycology and Indigenous Uses of Mushrooms Among the Bini-Speaking People of Nigeria: A Case Study of Aihuobabekun Community Near Benin City, Nigeria
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.7, 2005, issue 3
Benedicta Akpos Ehwerheferere, Emmanuel Oluwadare Akpaja, John Aroye Okhuoya
The Taxonomical and Nomenclatural Characteristics of Medicinal Mushrooms in Some Genera of Polyporaceae
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.12, 2010, issue 1
Ivan V. Zmitrovich