Доступ предоставлен для: Guest
Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Печать: 1072-8325
ISSN Онлайн: 1940-431X

Выпуски:
Том 25, 2019 Том 24, 2018 Том 23, 2017 Том 22, 2016 Том 21, 2015 Том 20, 2014 Том 19, 2013 Том 18, 2012 Том 17, 2011 Том 16, 2010 Том 15, 2009 Том 14, 2008 Том 13, 2007 Том 12, 2006 Том 11, 2005 Том 10, 2004 Том 9, 2003 Том 8, 2002 Том 7, 2001 Том 6, 2000 Том 5, 1999 Том 4, 1998 Том 3, 1997 Том 2, 1995 Том 1, 1994

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2018020527
pages 339-360

PREDICTING COLLEGE WOMEN'S PERCEPTIONS OF A FUTURE IN ENGINEERING BY THEIR EXPERIENCES OF MICROAGGRESSIONS, IDENTITY MANAGEMENT, AND SELF-EFFICACY IN COLLEGE ENGINEERING

Dara Naphan-Kingery
Vanderbilt University, 2201 West End Ave, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA
Marta Elliott
University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N Virginia St, Reno, Nevada 89557, USA

Краткое описание

This purpose of this study on college women majoring in engineering was to examine how their experience of gender microaggressions, the centrality of their identities as women and as engineers, and their strategic management of these identities predicted their self-efficacy and perceived future of graduating and seeking a career in engineering. Survey data were collected from 404 female undergraduate engineering students from two mid-sized universities in the Western U.S. and analyzed with confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Results suggested that women's engineering identity centrality, or the importance they placed on being engineering students to their self-concept, was beneficial for their perceived persistence in the field; whereas their gender identity centrality, or the importance they placed on being women, was problematic. However, identity management partially mitigated these associations. Engineering identity centrality predicted social recategorization, which is characterized by blending in with men and de-emphasizing one's gender. In contrast, gender identity centrality predicted positive distinctiveness, a strategy that is typified by attempts to improve men's perceptions of women. Social recategorization had no apparent benefits as an identity management strategy, whereas positive distinctiveness indirectly predicted increased likelihood of persistence via self-efficacy. The implications of these two strategies are discussed.


Articles with similar content:

Speaking Out on Gender: Reflections on Women's Advancement in the STEM Disciplines
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.13, 2007, issue 1
Faye Linda Wachs, Jill Nemiro
EXAMINING SENSE OF BELONGING AND CAMPUS RACIAL DIVERSITY EXPERIENCES AMONG WOMEN OF COLOR IN STEM LIVING-LEARNING PROGRAMS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.17, 2011, issue 3
Dawn R. Johnson
SENIOR WOMEN SCIENTISTS OVERLOOKED AND UNDERSTUDIED?
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.12, 2006, issue 4
Sue V. Rosser
PERSISTENCE OF WOMEN IN ENGINEERING CAREERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF CURRENT AND FORMER FEMALE ENGINEERS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.17, 2011, issue 1
Mary Fitzpatrick, Nadya Fouad, Jane P. Liu
THE GENDER DIFFERENCES: HISPANIC FEMALES AND MALES MAJORING IN SCIENCE OR ENGINEERING
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.14, 2008, issue 2
Susan Wightman Brown