Доступ предоставлен для: Guest
Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Печать: 1072-8325
ISSN Онлайн: 1940-431X

Выпуски:
Том 25, 2019 Том 24, 2018 Том 23, 2017 Том 22, 2016 Том 21, 2015 Том 20, 2014 Том 19, 2013 Том 18, 2012 Том 17, 2011 Том 16, 2010 Том 15, 2009 Том 14, 2008 Том 13, 2007 Том 12, 2006 Том 11, 2005 Том 10, 2004 Том 9, 2003 Том 8, 2002 Том 7, 2001 Том 6, 2000 Том 5, 1999 Том 4, 1998 Том 3, 1997 Том 2, 1995 Том 1, 1994

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v4.i4.20
pages 333-340

STUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF INSTRUCTION, PEER INTEREST, AND ADULT SUPPORT FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE: DIFFERENCES BY RACE AND GENDER

William J. Boone
Miami University, Oxford, OH
Jane Butler Kahle
School of Education and Allied Professions, Miami University, Oxford, OH

Краткое описание

Educational equity within science classrooms is a critical issue for America in the 1990s and beyond. In fact, race and gender considerations are watershed issues that must be confronted by all developed and developing countries in the twenty-first century. This paper presents a unique data set that was collected to monitor a portion of a statewide systemic initiative (SSI) for the reform of mathematics and science. Students were asked to describe what their teachers did in science, what they themselves did in their classes, how their friends viewed science, and how adults in their homes supported their science education. Items represented strategies and activities recommended by the National Science Education Standards (National Research Council, 1996). All responses were analyzed by student race and by gender in order to assess how different groups of students perceived their science classes, if different groups of students had more positive or negative attitudes and/or interest in science, and how adult support for science learning varied across four student groups (i.e., girls, boys, African Americans and whites). Results indicated that different types of teaching and learning activities occurred in classes taught by teachers who had participated in the SSI's professional development, compared with those who had not yet participated. Further, responses of both African-American and white students indicated that all students actively participated in science classes that were taught by SSI teachers. The findings suggest ways to modify the teaching of middle school science to meet the needs and interests of students who have historically been underrepresented in science.


Articles with similar content:

OUTREACH EMPHASIS ON THE HUMAN IMPACT POTENTIAL OF ENGINEERING IMPROVES PERCEPTIONS OF UNDERREPRESENTED GROUPS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.19, 2013, issue 1
Christina R. Scherrer
FEMALE UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING STUDENTS' PERSPECTIVES ON LABORATORY EXPERIENCES: THE COMPLEXITY OF SOCIAL, ROLE, AND SELF IDENTITIES
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.23, 2017, issue 4
Diane Silva Pimentel
Middle School-Aged Children's Attitudes toward Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology and the Effects of Media Literacy Training
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.12, 2006, issue 4
Stephanie Higdon, Yaschica Williams, Nikki Crocker, Paul Nwulu, Sarvani Kuchibhotla, Jocelyn Steinke, Aletta Zietsman-Thomas, Maria Lapinski
ENGINEERING SUCCESS: THE ROLE OF FACULTY RELATIONSHIPS WITH AFRICAN AMERICAN UNDERGRADUATES
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.17, 2011, issue 3
Christopher B. Newman
ISSUES OF EQUITY: A SYNTHESIS OF LITERATURE RELEVANT TO SCIENCE, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS CLASSROOMS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.12, 2006, issue 2-3
Lynn Liao Hodge