Доступ предоставлен для: Guest
Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.504 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Печать: 1072-8325
ISSN Онлайн: 1940-431X

Выпуски:
Том 25, 2019 Том 24, 2018 Том 23, 2017 Том 22, 2016 Том 21, 2015 Том 20, 2014 Том 19, 2013 Том 18, 2012 Том 17, 2011 Том 16, 2010 Том 15, 2009 Том 14, 2008 Том 13, 2007 Том 12, 2006 Том 11, 2005 Том 10, 2004 Том 9, 2003 Том 8, 2002 Том 7, 2001 Том 6, 2000 Том 5, 1999 Том 4, 1998 Том 3, 1997 Том 2, 1995 Том 1, 1994

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v8.i2.60
17 pages

COMPUTER USE AT HOME AND AT SCHOOL: DOES IT RELATE TO ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE?

Gary G. Huang
AmcrSino Group, 9515 Kings Grant Road, Laurel MD, 20723
Jianxia Du
Department of Educational Policy Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

Краткое описание

Analyzing data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 to 1992, this report examines how computer use produces generic benefit to all children and differential benefits to minority and poor children. Specifically, the authors examined computer use at home vis-a-vis computer use at school in relation to the academic performance of disadvantaged children and their peers (defined by race-ethnicity and socioeconomic status). Home computer use typifies socially differentiated opportunities, whereas school computer use promises generic benefits for all children. The findings suggest that with other relevant conditions constant, (a) disadvantaged children did not lag far behind their peers in computer use at school, but they were much less likely to use computers at home; (b) computer use at home was far more significant than computer use at school in relation to high academic performance; (c) wing a computer at school seemed to have dubious effects on learning—taking computer science courses at school related consistently to low performance far both disadvantaged children and their peers, (d) disadvantaged children benefited less than other children from computer use, including computer use at home; and (e) compared to their peers, disadvantaged children's academic performance seemed less predictable by computer use and other predictor variables.


Articles with similar content:

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS' ATTITUDES TOWARD SCIENCE: RESEARCH AND INTERVENTION
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.1, 1994, issue 4
Robert L. Ziomek, Sandra L. Stephen, Terry F. McNabb, Elizabeth Dunkman Riesz
INFLUENCE OF PRECOLLEGE EXPERIENCE ON SELF-CONCEPT AMONG COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS IN SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, AND ENGINEERING
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.11, 2005, issue 3
Soko Starobin, Frankie Santos Laanan
INCREASING DIVERSITY IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: ACKNOWLEDGING, YET MOVING BEYOND, GENDER
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.11, 2005, issue 2
Margaret L. Stubbs, Elizabeth A. Larsen
THE CONTINUED EVALUATION OF VOUCHER IMPACT ON THE ACHIEVEMENT OF ELEMENTARY STUDENTS IN A MAJORITY AFRICAN AMERICAN PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.10, 2004, issue 3
Kim K. Metcalf, Kelli M. Paul, William J. Boone, Natalie A. Legan
USING AND DOING SCIENCE: GENDER, SELF-EFFICACY, AND SCIENCE IDENTITY OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN STEM
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.20, 2014, issue 2
Montrischa M. Williams, Casey George-Jackson