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Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.133 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Печать: 1050-6934
ISSN Онлайн: 1940-4379

Выпуски:
Том 29, 2019 Том 28, 2018 Том 27, 2017 Том 26, 2016 Том 25, 2015 Том 24, 2014 Том 23, 2013 Том 22, 2012 Том 21, 2011 Том 20, 2010 Том 19, 2009 Том 18, 2008 Том 17, 2007 Том 16, 2006 Том 15, 2005 Том 14, 2004 Том 13, 2003 Том 12, 2002 Том 11, 2001 Том 10, 2000

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v17.i3.10
pages 181-185

Cost of Antibiotic Beads is Justified: A Study of Open Fracture Wounds and Chronic Osteomyelitis

Brenton A. Wright
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Louisville, School of Medicine, 210 E. Gray Street, Suite 1003, Louisville, KY
Craig S. Roberts
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Louisville, School of Medicine, 210 E. Gray Street, Suite 1003, Louisville, KY
David Seligson
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Louisville, School of Medicine, 210 E. Gray Street, Suite 1003, Louisville, KY
Arthur L. Malkani
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Louisville, School of Medicine, 210 E. Gray Street, Suite 1003, Louisville, KY
Steven J. McCabe
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Louisville, School of Medicine, 210 E. Gray Street, Suite 1003, Louisville, KY

Краткое описание

Background—The purpose of this study was to track the cost of antibiotic-impregnated bead chains and the outcome of treatment over a 30-month period occurring before USP Chapter 797 went into effect. Our overall objective was to determine whether the costs of antibiotic beads were justified by reduced rates of active infections associated with open fracture wounds or chronic osteomyelitis. Methods—We retrospectively reviewed 125 patients with open fracture wounds (Group 1) and 16 patients with chronic osteomyelitis (Group 2) treated over a 2.5-year period. We reviewed the medical records and performed cost calculations for the beads. The minimum time from treatment to the latest follow-up evaluation was six weeks (average, 30.7 weeks; range, 6-134 weeks) for Group 1 and six months (average, 61.8 weeks; range, 24−156 weeks) for Group 2. Results—The overall infection rates were 3.2% (96.8% free of active infection) for Group 1 and 25.0% (75.0% free of active infection) for Group 2. The average cost of antibiotic bead treatment per patient was $419.36 for Group 1 and $484.54 for Group 2. Conclusions—The costs of antibiotic beads to prevent active infection of open fracture wounds or to treat active infection associated with chronic osteomyelitis are justified based on the cost structure prior to the impact of new federal regulations (USP Chapter 797 regulations). We anticipate that the cost of antibiotic beads will increase dramatically with these new regulations.