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Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.133 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Печать: 1050-6934
ISSN Онлайн: 1940-4379

Выпуски:
Том 29, 2019 Том 28, 2018 Том 27, 2017 Том 26, 2016 Том 25, 2015 Том 24, 2014 Том 23, 2013 Том 22, 2012 Том 21, 2011 Том 20, 2010 Том 19, 2009 Том 18, 2008 Том 17, 2007 Том 16, 2006 Том 15, 2005 Том 14, 2004 Том 13, 2003 Том 12, 2002 Том 11, 2001 Том 10, 2000

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.2016016536
pages 167-171

A Biomechanical Comparison of Different Tendon Repair Techniques

Jeffrey E. Mait
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Westley T. Hayes
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center/University Hospital Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY
Christopher L. Blum
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Robert Pivec
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center/University Hospital Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY
Christian J. Zaino
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Julio J. Jauregui
Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center/University Hospital Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY
Subrata Saha
Affiliate Professor, Department of Restorative Dentistry Affiliate Instructor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery School of Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6365, USA; Courtesy Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33174, USA
Jaime A. Uribe
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center/University Hospital Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY
William P. Urban
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, State University of New York (SUNY), Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY

Краткое описание

Previous studies have examined multiple suture techniques for the repair of ruptured tendons. In this study, we investigated how the two- and four-stranded Krackow suture weave techniques compared with a novel Krackow/Bunnell suture technique. Our hypothesis was that the Krackow/Bunnell suture would have greater strength compared with the two- and four-stranded Krackow suture in terms of resistance to pullout from the muscle tendon. Thirty fresh bovine Achilles tendons were assigned randomly to three groups: (1) two-stranded Krackow, (2) fourstranded Krackow, and (3) the Krackow/Bunnell combination. After suture placement, all specimens were subjected to initial cyclic loading (0–200 N for 200 cycles) and then the tension to failure force defined as the pullout through the muscle tendon was evaluated. Significantly greater deformation before suture failure was seen in the Krackow/Bunnell group compared with the four-stranded Krackow construct (36.2 vs. 28.7 mm, p = 0.009), as well as greater energy required to rupture the suture (4635 vs. 3346 N/mm; p = 0.016). There was no significant difference with regard to the force to failure between the two groups (four-stranded Krackow vs. Krackow/Bunnell). The two-stranded Krackow was found to be inferior to both the four-stranded Krakow and the Krakow/Bunnell techniques with regard to load to failure. We have found that the Krackow/Bunnell suture technique is at least comparable to, if not superior to, the four-stranded Krackow technique with regard to deformation before suture failure and energy required to rupture the tendon. Therefore, the Krackow/Bunnell technique may be an optimal construct if the surgeon is concerned about suture pullout through the tendon; however, future studies evaluating this technique in the clinical setting are required before making any final conclusions for patient use.