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Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Interfacial Phenomena and Heat Transfer
ESCI SJR: 0.146

ISSN Печать: 2169-2785
ISSN Онлайн: 2167-857X

Open Access

Interfacial Phenomena and Heat Transfer

DOI: 10.1615/InterfacPhenomHeatTransfer.2013010182
pages 195-205

CONTROLLING THE MORPHOLOGY OF RING-LIKE DEPOSITS BY VARYING THE PINNING TIME OF DRIVEN RECEDING CONTACT LINES

Carmen L. Moraila-Martinez
Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Miguel A. Cabrerizo-Vilchez
Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Miguel A. Rodriguez-Valverde
Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain

Краткое описание

The variety of morphologies observed in the particle deposits produced by solvent evaporation may be ruled to a large extent by contact line dynamics and in particular, by self-pinning events described by the contact line. If the number of particles in the suspension bulk increases, more particles should be transported toward the contact line during evaporation. Increasing times of contact line pinning should lead to the same effect than particle concentration. In this work, we investigated the different ring-like deposits obtained at driven receding contact lines by varying separately nanoparticle concentration and pinning time.We used a recent methodology based on "shrinking" sessile drops to mimic the contact line dynamics of freely evaporating drops. Unlike drying drops, with this methodology the particle concentration in the drop bulk is assumed to remain mostly constant during the entire process.We concluded that no nanoparticle deposit is formed if the pinning time is reduced below a critical value for a given substrate-particle system. However, an increase of pinning time enables the ring formation even at low particle concentrations.