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Портал Begell Электронная Бибилиотека e-Книги Журналы Справочники и Сборники статей Коллекции
Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.117 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.17

ISSN Печать: 0896-2960
ISSN Онлайн: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.v14.i2.20
9 pages

Wrist Strength Measurement: A Review of Intrarater and Interrater Reliability of Isokinetic Dynamometry

Monica Broniecki
Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Esther May
School of Occupational Therapy, Head, School of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy, University of South Australia, City East Campus, North Terrace, Adelaide 5000, South Australia
Mary Russell
School of Occupational Therapy, University of South Australia

Краткое описание

In a clinical setting, direct measures of wrist strength are used as indicators for treatment or to determine the benefits of intervention. Isokinetic dynamometers are instruments that are used to assess the strength of various muscle groups, including the muscles acting on the wrist. However, there are particular factors associated with the wrist that make measuring wrist strength more difficult. These factors have an impact on the reliability of the measurement process and the capacity for clinicians to confidently use the data produced. An understanding of factors that affect the reliability when using isokinetic dynamometers to assess wrist strength will assist clinicians and researchers to better interpret the measurements produced. The aim of this literature review is to explore the intrarater and interrater reliability of isokinetic dynamometers in general, and the impact of these general considerations when using such instruments to assess the strength of muscle groups acting on the wrist. This review is based on the relevant literature, which includes articles published from 1982 to 2000, with some key articles in the period of 1963 to 1982. A range of journals with a focus on rehabilitation, movement, and exercise science were included. The variables that affect reliability are discussed in turn, and key characteristics that would need to be considered if a new instrument were to be developed for assessing wrist strength are identified.